Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Early look at Intel's Compute Cards including RRPs


Whilst Intel's Compute Stick can certainly be considered a success as a mini 'stick' PC the next generation is now on hold and in place is an evolution called the Intel Compute Card which has a different form factor and extended target use. It is expected to be available any time soon and there is already available a wealth of information in terms of specifications and costs.

Basically the compute card takes the compute stick but factors it as a module meaning that it is no longer standalone but dependent on a dock or host device.

Four compute cards are initially planned with three launched this quarter and one for mid-late Q4.


Looking at the specification of the cards in detail


we see the amount of storage and memory has been increased for the cards with faster processors. Why? Because there is no limitation from Microsoft as none of the cards come with a pre-installed OS. According to the technical specifications they will
support the following Operating Systems (64-bit only).
· Windows 10 Home
· Windows 10 Pro
· Windows 10 Enterprise
· Windows 10 Education
· Windows 10 IoT Enterprise
· Some Linux operating systems may be supported. Check with the specific Linux distribution to make sure that support is available for this platform
The card itself is relatively small with a footprint slightly larger than a standard credit card.



The card includes a connector which is separated into two sections: a Type C-compliant portion and an extended portion. The Type C portion supports Type C-compliant connections including video with audio and USB. The extended portion supports video with audio, USB, and PCIe. Power is supplied to the card from the device the Compute Card is plugged into using the Type C portion of the connector.

So you can simply plug in a USB Type C cable and be up and running? No. As mentioned you will need a dock or host device and not just any device as the card uses bidirectional authentication to attempt to authenticate the compatible device and the compatible device will attempt to authenticate the card. The authentication uses digital keys which are provisioned by default during manufacturing for every card and compatible device ensuring they only work with correctly provisioned card and devices.

There is a reason for this other than the obvious commercial 'manufacturer tie-in'. The card will get hot and it totally relies on the host device for cooling because it is designed so that direct conductive contact with the card surfaces provide the best overall heat dissipation. That means because the card is capable of operating within all critical component temperature specifications it will produce surface skin temperatures that may violate typical safety guidelines or requirements. To stop you being the cooling device for the card when you touch it the device must delay the card being ejected if additional cooling is needed to reduce the skin temperature to the recommendation of no more than 55 °C.

Given that the market of Intel compute card is now very much orientated to OEMs, manufacturers, distributors and channel partners it is fortunate that Intel have also launched a commercially available Intel Compute Card Dock.



Essentially you insert your compute card and effectively have a mini PC



that also comes with a VESA mount.



Looking at the specifications of the dock


it comes with a power adapter with a range of interchangeable international plugs together with a two metre/six foot long power cable.

When looking at the cost for each card a key factor to take into consideration is that the card comes with a three (3) year warranty. Given the support that Intel offers including regular BIOS updates and RMA for defective devices under warranty then this obviously comes at a cost which is not unreasonable. Added to the card cost is the dock which only comes with a one (1) year warranty (no doubt limited because of the internal fan). And then there is the OS which for Linux users isn't an issue but for Windows users loosing out on an included OEM provided license for a small supplement might be off putting.

The modular format is certainly going to be advantageous in certain circumstances. From a commercial viewpoint the support aspects of simply being able to swap out a faulty card is fantastic. I can also see a use as a 'Chromecard'. In schools where Chromebooks have been adopted the simplicity of a card and ease of portability for the student seems highly attractive.

But what of the future for the Intel Compute Card? Intel indicated that they would be evaluating the future of the Compute Stick in 2018 and decide if it warrants an update with the latest processors at that time.


Useful resources: 

Manuals and Guides
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/boards-and-kits/intel-compute-card/000024440.html

Technical Product Specifications
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/boards-and-kits/intel-compute-card/000024427.html

Support Links
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/boards-and-kits/intel-compute-card/000023817.html

Support Forum
https://communities.intel.com/community/tech/intel-compute-card/content


Monday, 11 September 2017

Ubuntu 17.10 from 10 September with v4.13.0-9 Kernel


As Ubuntu does not 'opt-in' to the beta ISO releases of Artful Aardvark (17.10) I thought it would be interesting to respin the latest daily release (10th September) together with the rolling 'unstable' kernel of v4.13.0-9 and produce ISOs for both Atom-based and Apollo-based mini PCs to see what the current progress is.

The ISOs can be downloaded from:

  • Atom (-i artful-desktop-amd64.iso --rolling-unstable --atom)
  • Apollo (-i artful-desktop-amd64.iso --rolling-unstable --apollo)

Whilst the ISOs target specific Intel architectures to ensure everything works they should also work on any Intel devices.

Anyone wanting to spin their own version can download the latest Ubuntu daily ISO from http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/daily-live and respin using my 'isorespin.sh' script using the options above.

Please donate if you find the ISOs or script useful using the following link http://goo.gl/nXWSGf.

Sunday, 10 September 2017

Artful Aardvark Beta 1 and Mainline Kernel v4.13 Released

The first beta ISOs of Artful Aardvark (17.10) have now been released and so has the v4.13 mainline kernel so I've decided to combine both by taking Lubuntu Beta 1 and updating with the rolling 'unstable' kernel of v4.13.0-9 and produces ISOs for both Atom-based and Apollo-based mini PCs.


The ISOs can be downloaded from:

  • Atom (-i lubuntu-17.10-beta1-desktop-amd64.iso --rolling-unstable --atom)
  • Apollo (-i lubuntu-17.10-beta1-desktop-amd64.iso --rolling-unstable --apollo)

Both the official announcement for Lubuntu (http://lubuntu.me/lubuntu-artful-aardvark-beta-1-has-been-released) and the release notes (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/Beta1/Lubuntu) should be read.

Whilst the ISOs target specific Intel architectures to ensure everything works they should also work on any Intel devices.

Anyone wanting to spin their own version can download the Lubuntu Beta 1 ISO from http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/artful/beta-1/lubuntu-17.10-beta1-desktop-amd64.iso and respin using my 'isorespin.sh' script using the options above.

Please donate if you find the ISOs or script useful using the following link http://goo.gl/nXWSGf.

Friday, 1 September 2017

New version of ISO respin script released

Now that my script supports updates to rolling kernels and target processors I've improved the naming of the respun ISO to better reflect how it was created. The key change is to include the kernel version in the name of the respun ISO when respinning upgrades the original version together with the name of the target processor if respun using that option.

The new version (7.3.3) of 'isorespin.sh' is now available for download.

Any issues or improvement suggestions are welcome.

Please donate if you find the script useful using the following link http://goo.gl/nXWSGf.

Thursday, 24 August 2017

Installing 'isorespin.sh' ISOs on Apollo Lake devices


Previously installation on Intel Apollo Lake devices without explicit Linux support in the BIOS required the rEFInd boot manager to be installed manually. Following a number of requests I've now updated my 'isorespin.sh' script to add this automatically to the respun ISO making it transparent duing the installation of the ISO.

I've also changed the script so that it no longer requires the removal of any 'isorespin.log' file first as it will now simply overwrite it. Instead the respun ISO now includes a README file which details how the ISO was spun.



Also the latest Ubuntu Artful 17.10 build includes an Ubuntu fork of the Dash to Dock extension as Ubuntu Dock. So I've respun the daily build from 21st August and added the v4.13-rc6 kernel and the rEFInd boot manager and anyone who want to see how it looks on an Apollo Lake device can download the ISO from here and the upgraded script can be downloaded from 'isorespin.sh'.

Please donate if you find the script useful using the following link http://goo.gl/nXWSGf.





Sunday, 6 August 2017

Respinning security distros and upgrading packages

A while back I dropped Debian and Debian based ISO support from my 'isorespin.sh' script as the release of Debian 9 Stretch uses a v4.9 kernel rather than a v3.16 kernel meaning that the kernel cannot be upgraded with Canonical's HDMI and RTL8723BS DKMS support. I also dropped their support because I do not agree with using a kernel compiled for one distro's userland with a different distro's userland as for example in using an Ubuntu kernel to boot a Fedora ISO.

This meant no more respinning Kali ISOs but since I'm again receiving requests for its support it got me thinking about what Ubuntu-based security distros existed. So following some research I've added support for BackBox Linux a 'penetration testing and security assessment oriented Linux distribution providing a network and systems analysis toolkit'.


Respinning is simple using my latest version of 'isorespin.sh':

Script '/usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh' called with '-i backbox-5-amd64.iso --atom --update' ...
Work directory 'isorespin' used ...
ISO '/home/linuxium/backbox-5-amd64.iso' respun ...
Bootloader 'GRUB' added ...
Kernel updated with mainline kernel version '4.13.0-041300rc3-generic' ...
Local package '/home/linuxium/isorespin/rtl8723bs_4.12.0_amd64.deb' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
Command run ...
# wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Extracting UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installing UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Reloading UCM driver ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installation of UCM finished 
# wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Extracting Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Reloading Broadcom driver ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/brcmbt.service, pointing to /lib/systemd/system/brcmbt.service.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Starting Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Running in chroot, ignoring request.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installation of Broadcom finished 
Respun ISO created as 'linuxium-v4.13-rc3-backbox-5-amd64.iso'.

I've also had another look at Kali as whilst their official ISOs use a Debian kernel they also offer Kali Metapackages which 'give you the flexibility to install specific subsets of tools based on your particular needs'. Following the documented instructions I looked at how I could update my script to allow the addition of these metapackages when respinning. As a result I've added a new option '--key' to add GPG keys to the APT keyring allowing packages to be downloaded from signed repositories. It is now possible to respin an Ubuntu ISO adding the packages:


There are some restrictions/limitations. Unity isn't supported and I've found adding a GPG key to a 17.04 or 17.10 release fails. Additionally adding the 'kali-linux-full' package results in dependency issues. However it is possible to respin the recently released Ubuntu GNOME 16.04.3 and add 'kali-linux' and 'kali-linux-top10':

Script '/usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh' called with '-i ubuntu-gnome-16.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso --atom -u --key adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys ED444FF07D8D0BF6 --repository deb http://http.kali.org/kali kali-rolling main contrib non-free -p kali-linux -p kali-linux-top10' ...
Work directory 'isorespin' used ...
ISO '/home/linuxium/ubuntu-gnome-16.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso' respun ...
Bootloader 'GRUB' added ...
Kernel updated with mainline kernel version '4.13.0-041300rc3-generic' ...
Key 'adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys ED444FF07D8D0BF6' added ...
Repository 'deb http://http.kali.org/kali kali-rolling main contrib non-free' added ...
Package 'kali-linux' added ...
Package 'kali-linux-top10' added ...
Local package '/home/linuxium/isorespin/rtl8723bs_4.12.0_amd64.deb' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
Command run ...
# wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Extracting UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installing UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Reloading UCM driver ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installation of UCM finished 
# wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Extracting Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Reloading Broadcom driver ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/brcmbt.service, pointing to /lib/systemd/system/brcmbt.service.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Starting Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Running in chroot, ignoring request.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installation of Broadcom finished 
Respun ISO created as 'linuxium-v4.13-rc3-ubuntu-gnome-16.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso'.

Lubuntu is also supported:


and by adding 'kali-desktop-lxde' additional LXDE packages are included (note 'Other'):


Script '/usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh' called with '-i lubuntu-16.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso --atom -u --key adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys ED444FF07D8D0BF6 --repository deb http://http.kali.org/kali kali-rolling main contrib non-free -p kali-linux -p kali-desktop-lxde -p kali-linux-top10' ...
Work directory 'isorespin' used ...
ISO '/home/linuxium/lubuntu-16.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso' respun ...
Bootloader 'GRUB' added ...
Kernel updated with mainline kernel version '4.13.0-041300rc3-generic' ...
Key 'adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys ED444FF07D8D0BF6' added ...
Repository 'deb http://http.kali.org/kali kali-rolling main contrib non-free' added ...
Package 'kali-linux' added ...
Package 'kali-desktop-lxde' added ...
Package 'kali-linux-top10' added ...
Local package '/home/linuxium/isorespin/rtl8723bs_4.12.0_amd64.deb' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
Command run ...
# wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Extracting UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installing UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Reloading UCM driver ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installation of UCM finished 
# wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Extracting Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Reloading Broadcom driver ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/brcmbt.service, pointing to /lib/systemd/system/brcmbt.service.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Starting Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Running in chroot, ignoring request.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installation of Broadcom finished 
Respun ISO created as 'linuxium-v4.13-rc3-lubuntu-16.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso'.

Finally I've added another option '--upgrade' which simply performs an 'apt-get upgrade' on the ISO's packages. So for example having downloaded an Artful daily ISO, I can respin it with the latest packages:


Script '/usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh' called with '-i 030817-artful-desktop-amd64.iso --upgrade --rolling-unstable --atom -s 200MB' ...
Work directory 'isorespin' used ...
ISO '/home/linuxium/030817-artful-desktop-amd64.iso' respun ...
Kernel boot parameters 'persistent' added ...
Bootmanager 'rEFInd' added ...
Distro upgraded ...
Package 'linux-headers-4.12.0-9 linux-headers-4.12.0-9-generic linux-image-4.12.0-9-generic linux-image-extra-4.12.0-9-generic' added ...
Local package '/home/linuxium/isorespin/rtl8723bt_4.12.0_amd64.deb' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
Command run ...
# wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Extracting UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installing UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Reloading UCM driver ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installation of UCM finished 
# wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Extracting Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Reloading Broadcom driver ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/brcmbt.service -> /lib/systemd/system/brcmbt.service.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Starting Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Running in chroot, ignoring request.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installation of Broadcom finished 
Persistence partition of '200MB' added ...
Respun ISO created as 'linuxium-persistence-030817-artful-desktop-amd64.iso'.

The new flags are only available from a CLI invocation:


and the upgraded script can be downloaded from 'isorespin.sh'.

Please donate if you find the script useful using the following link http://goo.gl/nXWSGf.

Saturday, 29 July 2017

Rolling kernels, target processors and Peppermint OS in latest 'isorespin.sh' update


I've updated my 'isorespin.sh' script to include the following concepts:

  • rolling kernels
  • target processors

and I've additionally included support for Peppermint OS (an Ubuntu kernel based distro).

The  need for rolling kernels  is primarily to address the shortfall that existing ISO kernels typically don't have the hardware support required for the latest devices. They ship with the 'kernel of the day' whereas the latest hardware tends to require, well, the latest kernel to fully work. Ubuntu have in part addressed this through their LTS Enablement Stacks. Another alternative to get 'newer' kernels is to enable the proposed repository however there is also a pre-release and test kernel repository together with the unstable repository where mainline kernels are migrated into Ubuntu as well as the upstream mainline kernels.


I've added an option '--rolling-list' to keeping track of what new kernels are available where with options to easily incorporate them when respinning an ISO. I've termed the kernel types as release, proposed, testing and unstable to reflect the repositories they are drawn from as described above. And if it is not abundantly obvious but any kernel other than the formally released ones are not encouraged for anyone needing a stable system or anyone who is not comfortable running into occasional or even frequent breakage.

The other concept I've introduced is respinning an ISO for a target processor. Whilst I've documented how to respin an ISO and what to include it does require reading. So now by including the option of '--atom' or '--apollo' you'll get an ISO that hopefully works on devices with the respective Intel SoCs. The options simply include the flags, packages, scripts and commands that I recommend and mirror the manual invocations of:

For '--atom': -l rtl8723bX_4.12.0_amd64.deb -f linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh -f wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh -f linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh -f wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh -c wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh -c wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh

For '--apollo': -b rEFInd

The files are automatically downloaded from the internet if they are not found as part of the command invocation and this should simplify respinning for those looking something quick and easy.

Both these new functionality require that you have the 'curl' package installed prior to running the respin script however the script will check and warn you if it is missing.

The new syntax for 'isorespin.sh' is:

Usage: /usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh [ -h | -v | --rolling-list ]
       /usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh -i <ISO> [ [ -u | -k <kernel> ] | -r "<repo> ... " | -p "<pkg> ... " | -l "<pkg.deb> ... " | -f "<file> | <directory> ... " | [ -s <size>MB | GB ] | [ -b GRUB | rEFInd ] | ...
       /usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh ... -w <directory> | -d "<pkg> ... " | -e "<pkg> ... " | -c "<cmd> ... " | -o "<file> | <directory> ... " | -g "" | "<kernel boot parameter> ... " | ...
       /usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh ... --apollo | --atom | ...
       /usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh ... --rolling-release | --rolling-release-hwe | --rolling-release-hwe-edge | --rolling-proposed | --rolling-proposed-hwe | --rolling-proposed-hwe-edge | ...
       /usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh ... --rolling-testing | --rolling-testing-hwe | --rolling-testing-hwe-edge | --rolling-unstable | --rolling-unstable-hwe | --rolling-unstable-hwe-edge ]

and the options have been included in the GUI:





I've also added Peppermint OS support. This OS uses an Ubuntu kernel and is particularly suitabale for low specification devices like the original Ubuntu Intel Compute Stick which only has 1GB RAM and 8GB storage.


I was able to watch a YouTube video at 1080p via wifi which is pretty impressive for that device.



Mainline kernel v4.13 is progressing with RC2 released this week.


As the opt-in Ubuntu flavours released their Artful 17.10 Alpha 2 ISOs yesterday I've respun the Lubuntu one with "--atom -u" which generated the log:

Script '/usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh' called with '-i lubuntu-17.10-alpha2-desktop-amd64.iso --atom -u' ...
Work directory 'isorespin' used ...
ISO '/home/linuxium/lubuntu-17.10-alpha2-desktop-amd64.iso' respun ...
Bootloader 'GRUB' added ...
Kernel updated with mainline kernel version '4.13.0-041300rc2-generic' ...
Local package '/home/linuxium/isorespin/rtl8723bt_4.12.0_amd64.deb' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
Command run ...
# wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Extracting UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installing UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Reloading UCM driver ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installation of UCM finished 
# wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Extracting Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Reloading Broadcom driver ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/brcmbt.service -> /lib/systemd/system/brcmbt.service.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Starting Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Running in chroot, ignoring request.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installation of Broadcom finished 
Respun ISO created as 'linuxium-v4.13-rc2-lubuntu-17.10-alpha2-desktop-amd64.iso'.

and the respun ISO can be downloaded from here.


I've also respun the Ubuntu 17.04 ISO and added a 200MB persistent partition meaning the ISO which now supports Intel Atom devices with also boot on Intel Apollo devices:

Script '/usr/local/bin/isorespin.sh' called with '-i ubuntu-17.04-desktop-amd64.iso -u --atom -s 200MB' ...
Work directory 'isorespin' used ...
ISO '/home/linuxium/ubuntu-17.04-desktop-amd64.iso' respun ...
Kernel boot parameters 'persistent' added ...
Bootmanager 'rEFInd' added ...
Kernel updated with mainline kernel version '4.13.0-041300rc2-generic' ...
Local package '/home/linuxium/isorespin/rtl8723bs_4.12.0_amd64.deb' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
File '/home/linuxium/isorespin/wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh' added ...
Command run ...
# wrapper-linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Extracting UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installing UCM files ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Reloading UCM driver ...
./linuxium-install-UCM-files.sh: Installation of UCM finished 
# wrapper-linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Extracting Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom files ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Reloading Broadcom driver ...
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installing Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/brcmbt.service -> /lib/systemd/system/brcmbt.service.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Starting Broadcom bluetooth service ...
Running in chroot, ignoring request.
./linuxium-install-broadcom-drivers.sh: Installation of Broadcom finished 
Persistence partition of '200MB' added ...
Respun ISO created as 'linuxium-persistence-v4.13-rc2-ubuntu-17.04-desktop-amd64.iso'.

and the respun ISO can be downloaded from here.

Anyone interested in running an ISO shown in the opening image can just respin the latest daily Ubuntu release with '--rolling-unstable --atom' options. Simple!

Please donate if you find the script useful using the following link http://goo.gl/nXWSGf as everything helps with development costs.